Autor Tema: RIP Leonard Nimoy  (Pročitano 6879 puta)

0 članova i 1 gost pregledaju ovu temu.

Van mreže DieH@rd

  • Living in 4K HDR
  • Dominator
  • *****
  • Poruke: 15472
« Poslednja izmena: 27.02.2015 18:20:26 DieH@rd »

Van mreže Aca

  • Global Moderator
  • Dominator
  • *****
  • Poruke: 9943
Odg: RIP Leonard Nimoy
« Odgovor #1 poslato: 27.02.2015 18:23:30 »
E, jbg....ali imao je lepe godine...    :?:

Van mreže Relja

  • Administrator
  • Dominator
  • *****
  • Poruke: 16217
  • ALL HAIL MEGATRON!
    • http://www.photontide.org
Odg: RIP Leonard Nimoy
« Odgovor #2 poslato: 27.02.2015 20:32:17 »
Lived long and prospered. Slava mu.

Van mreže Smiksica

  • Terminator
  • ***
  • Poruke: 176
Odg: RIP Leonard Nimoy
« Odgovor #3 poslato: 27.02.2015 22:35:58 »
 :(

« Poslednja izmena: 28.02.2015 07:52:03 Aca »

Van mreže DieH@rd

  • Living in 4K HDR
  • Dominator
  • *****
  • Poruke: 15472
Odg: RIP Leonard Nimoy
« Odgovor #4 poslato: 27.02.2015 22:36:28 »
njegov poslednji tweet


Van mreže Relja

  • Administrator
  • Dominator
  • *****
  • Poruke: 16217
  • ALL HAIL MEGATRON!
    • http://www.photontide.org
Odg: RIP Leonard Nimoy
« Odgovor #5 poslato: 28.02.2015 08:49:22 »
Roger Nygard, režiser Trekkies dokumentaraca, postovao mi je ovo na wall danas:

Citat
In honor of Leonard Nimoy, here is an unreleased excerpt from the TREKKIES documentary interviews.

Denise Crosby: What made Star Trek so special?

Leonard Nimoy: A lot of elements had to come together for this kind of television show to happen. There was very little intelligent science fiction being done for the mass media at the time. It came at a very turbulent time when the future of society, the planet, everything was up for grabs. Nobody knew where we were going. There was this tremendous counterculture movement because the status quo was no longer acceptable to large masses of people. And here was this television series that was dealing with racial issues, sexual issues, economic issues, overpopulation issues, pollution issues…unlike other science fiction. And this show said, ‘we’ll make it through this and we’ll come out better on the other side.’

Now what I also find pretty interesting is, if you go over the list of fans’ favorite episodes—at least from the original series—I think you’d be surprised to find that a large percentage of the favorite episodes are not about adversarial relationships. They about interesting problems that have to do with the internal workings of society, comic or dramatic.

The Klingons were our stand-ins for the communist block, what Ronald Reagan referred to as “the evil empire.” They were our traditional adversaries; they were always a danger and a threat. When I was asked to produce Star Trek VI, The Undiscovered Country, the storyline that I came up with was affected by the fact that just prior the Berlin Wall came down and the Chernobyl incident occurred, which was a landmark incident in the Soviet empire. For the first time in public memory there was this catastrophic event in the Soviet Union that they couldn’t hide. They were suddenly a vulnerable empire. So I created this story about where the Klingons have their version of Chernobyl--a terrible incident had taken place. The Klingons had over invested in the military, had over invested in expansionism, and couldn’t support their own economy any more and had to reach out to the Federation for a détente and say maybe we can work together. In a sense that was the beginning of the end of the Klingon terrorism. Around the same on Star Trek the Next Generation they introduced a Klingon who was a member of the crew on board the Enterprise. So we saw a shift, and since then I think the Klingons have no longer been the primary adversaries.

There was an interesting episode in the Original Series where we dealt with the problem with drugs. There was no adversary. It was a story in which we were summoned to a planet where it seems as though the people have become unmotivated. When we arrive there we discover there’s a young lady whom Spock had known sometime earlier. On a walk with her he encounters a plant that opens and pops out these spores. They effect Spock in a way which removes inhibitions and restrictions and he admits to having once loved this lady and now loves her again and gets into this very romantic childlike loving stage. The story has something to do with the false impressions that drugs give, a temporary euphoria, while your real life is slipping away. What the episode said is this stuff is a fantasy existence and you can’t count on it or depend on it, you shouldn’t build a life on it. It was a touching episode because Spock found himself in a loving experience, an open loving experience. The lady was Jill Ireland, very lovely gal.

In Star Trek IV: The Voyage Home there was no heavy in the movie. The conflict came from lack of education, lack of foresight; the problems created by earlier generations were now being visited by later generations, and in this case the problem was specifically, lack of concern about endangered species, specifically the Humpback whale. I got to thinking what would happen to future generations if certain keystone species were lost, how might it affect the future of mankind, and then extended that into a science-fiction metaphor. Here comes this thing from out there in space looking for something that is lost, which turns out to be the Humpback whale, and it is vaporizing the oceans in the process not because it is angry or hostile but simply because it’s looking for a lost friend: ’what’s happened to my friend the Humpback whale? I’m not hearing whale song anymore.’ And the planet is jeopardized as a result. There’s a certain amount of comedy in the movie as well, and a lot of people would say that was the reason the movie was successful. I like to think it was because people understood that there’s something very human going on here that is identifiable. You wouldn’t call it an adventure film, you wouldn’t call it an adversarial process, that was not the point of this movie and it was the most successful. And I think you’d find with the original series that was often the case with favorite episodes. It was not about nasty people doing nasty things. It was about the human condition being explored.

Denise: How long do you think this phenomenon will go on?

Leonard: People asked me if I knew when we started if we would last this long and I joked and said ‘yes I do’. I was the only one who knew. Nobody else knew. I predicted that we would last at least thirty years. I don’t know. I hope it lasts forever. It’s a good thing....as long as it’s thoughtful it’s a good thing.

(c) Copyright 2015 by Trekkies Productions

Van mreže carnifex

  • Sarmofil
  • Dominator
  • *****
  • Poruke: 3188
  • Sarma prevails
Odg: RIP Leonard Nimoy
« Odgovor #6 poslato: 28.02.2015 14:42:28 »
Citam ovaj citat gore i samo mogu da konstatujem da je bio pravi gospodin. Ako se ovo uporedi intervjuima danasnjih 'zvezdi' dolazi se do zalosnog zakljucka da su sve vrednosti u mosovnoj kulturi uzasno devalvirale i da su danasnje zvezde (vecina njih) samo lepa lica i nista vise.
« Poslednja izmena: 28.02.2015 19:31:03 carnifex »
"I've seen things you people wouldn't believe. Attack ships on fire off the shoulder of Orion. I watched C-beams glitter in the dark near the Tannhauser gate. All those moments will be lost in time... like tears in rain... Time to die." Roy Batty, Blade Runner

Van mreže Aca

  • Global Moderator
  • Dominator
  • *****
  • Poruke: 9943
Odg: RIP Leonard Nimoy
« Odgovor #7 poslato: 01.03.2015 11:39:59 »
Not photoshop. It's an actual sign in Atlanta.



Van mreže Aca

  • Global Moderator
  • Dominator
  • *****
  • Poruke: 9943

Van mreže Relja

  • Administrator
  • Dominator
  • *****
  • Poruke: 16217
  • ALL HAIL MEGATRON!
    • http://www.photontide.org